LET'S GET THOSE PUMPKINS READY FOR HALLOWEEN

I just picked up four different sizes of pumpkins from my parents' garden to carve and set outside on my front step this year. Sometimes I carve them, and sometimes I just set them out as festive fall decor. But one that is sure to happen every single year? Before I get a chance to throw them out, they start rotting on my front steps...a mess that no one wants to deal with.

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THIS COMMON HOUSEHOLD ITEM CAN PRESERVE YOUR CARVED PUMPKINS

I discovered that there IS a way to preserve your beautiful carved pumpkins. Actually, I found a ton of hacks you can try, but some of them sounded crazier than the others. so here goes. You try it, and let me know your results.

WD-40

What???? Do you want me to spray WD-40 all over my carved pumpkin? The answer is yes. The experts say that if you spray your entire carved pumpkin with WD-40  inside and out. If you are NOT going to carve it, just spray the entire outside of the pumpkin with WD-40 and just see how long it outlasts the regular old pumpkins sitting outside in the elements. Apparently, the main ingredient in WD-40 is mineral oil, so it should help your pumpkins stay hydrated, yet protected from moisture, and since it also contains Alkanes making your pumpkin water-resistant and freeze resistant! Who knew.  I think I want to do a test this year. Spray three of my pumpkins with WD-40 and leave one to take on the elements alone. Then I could see if this method really works. It's worth a try?

WARNING: FIRE HAZARD

You may want to forget about putting a candle inside your carved pumpkin creation though if you decide to try this. The oil IS flammable, so maybe just use a little tiny night light inside your carved pumpkins this year. Happy Halloween.  NOTE: WD-40 is considered SAFE according to the guidelines set forth by governments and regulatory bodies. However, it can still pose health risks and ultimately are synthetic chemicals, so if you think you have wild animals or pets that will eat your pumpkin, you may want to use something like cooking spray.

 

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