Minnesota Men...Enough Is Enough!

Keisha Diephuis is a single mom in Rochester, Minnesota and her dating life is filled with twists and turns and she documents it all. You can hear her every Tuesday at about 7:40 on the Y-105FM Early Morning Show in a new feature called, "Adventures In Dating with Keisha."

Keisha Diephuis
Keisha Diephuis
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Tap play to hear this week's episode where Keisha dials in on disgustingly aggressive guys that think if you don't respond, it's a personal attack and/or decide the way to win you is with a  photo you never asked for and definitely do not want to see. Just click play to hear the latest episode. (Or read the automatically/unedited transcription by clicking here.)

And you can click here to hear it in today's Y-105FM Early Morning Show

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Why Do Men Send Unsolicited Sexual Pictures?

"You don't love me? Did you get my last picture? And you STILL don't love me? This world makes no sense. Being a man is so hard!" diego_cervo
"You don't love me? Did you get my last picture? And you STILL don't love me? This world makes no sense. Being a man is so hard!" diego_cervo
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A lot of men don't, maybe they're just not gross, or they're gross but lack the audacity, or gross and also have zero confidence it would impress everyone. I hit the Googles and there was actually a study done about this. I found it on PsyPost 

Men who send unsolicited images of their private parts primarily do so with the hopes of receiving either similar images or sexual interactions in return, according to a new study published in the Journal of Sex Research.

The name of the study is a little silly, "I’ll Show You Mine so You’ll Show Me Yours: Motivations and Personality Variables in Photographic Exhibitionism." I cannot vouch for their research being awesome or not awesome, so take it for what it's worth.

The researchers It found that of the 1,087 heterosexual men in the project, about half sent unsolicited pictures of their genitals.

Rabe/Canva
Rabe/Canva
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"... men who sent unsolicited images tended to be younger, more narcissistic, and more sexist. The most common motivation for sending such an image was hoping to receive sexual pictures in return, followed by hoping to turn on the recipient." PsyPost

About 10% of the men sent them not in hopes of turning women on, but to actually anger them, show power over them, etc.

They're just now studying women's reactions to such images, but if I've learned anything in this life, it's men should NOT be sending what is known colloquially as "d-pics."

As always, if you have a comment, complaint, or concern about something I wrote here, please let me know: james.rabe@townsquaremedia.com

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