A Minnesota guy decided he wasn't happy with a certain part of himself so he decided to have surgery done. The thing is, it cost around $170,000 and the surgery sounds absolutely awful.

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So back to this guy and his crazy surgery. His name is Moses and he decided he didn't like his height. The Daily Mail says that he has been unhappy about his height since he was 15. At his tallest, he was 5-foot-5 and he was extremely unhappy.

Moses decided to try medicines, he found a holistic healer who said they could help him, but nothing ended up working. So he saved up his money and decided to have leg lengthening surgery. Ahh that makes me squirm, I hate the idea of leg lengthening surgery.

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His initial procedure happened in 2016 and gave him three extra inches of height. He wanted to be taller though. So about a month ago, he had his second surgery to add two more inches to his height.

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You won't believe what doctors had to do for the surgery. They literally broke his bones! They broke his tibia and fibula bones, the bones in the bottom half of your legs, and screwed magnetic leg lengthening screws into them. NO THANK YOU!

Now, Moses has to use a height-lengthening device three times per day "which pulls the cut bones apart one millimeter at a time. This encourages his body to create new bone tissue, which will fill the gap until his desired height is achieved."

I hope he's satisfied with his surgery and I hope that the healing process goes well for him but that's going to be a hard pass from me.

KEEP READING: The 30 Highest Paying Jobs in Minnesota

If you're thinking about going back to school to pursue a new career you should definitely consider one of the jobs listed below. Zippia used data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to determine the highest paying jobs in the state. Keep scrolling to see who is cashing in.

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