Jamie Erdahl, a former St. Olaf College athlete, was recently named to host NFL Network's Good Morning Football program.  She replaces Kay Adams on the show.

Erdahl, 33,  as born in Bloomington, Minnesota.  She was a talented multi-sport athlete at Breck High School before going on to play basketball and softball at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Mn.

Erdahl then attended American University where she got her degree in communications.

She will make her debut on Monday, July 25, with the show airing live from New York City at 6:00 a.m. Central Time.

Erdahl is hosting the award-winning football show alongside co-hosts Peter Schrager, Kyle Brandt and Will Selva.

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Her first reporting jobs were on the sidelines at Minnesota high school basketball games which led eto a job with New England Sports Network (NESN) as a rinkside reporter for  the Boston Bruins, in addition to covering the Boston Red Sox.

CBS Sports hired her in 2014, in 2018 she was promoted to top sideline reporter for the SEC Game of the Week, where she worked with fellow Minnesotan Brad Nessler (St. Charles).

Erdahl also worked as a sideline reporter for the NFL on CBS, in addition to working NCAA basketball games.

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She is married to former NFL player Sam Buckman in 2017 and they have one child.

It's always awesome to see a Minnesotan doing well on the national media scene.

For all the weather observers out there.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.