This past weekend was Halloween.  Little kids running all over the neighborhood- going way out of their neighborhoods (is that ok? A discussion for another day) and having fun for what I call "free candy day".

When I took the dog out for his stroll last evening, after the trick or treating was over, I noticed that a few people in my neighborhood already put the holiday lights up on their house, and lit them up!  Now, I completely understand why you would put the light up now- it's warmer and probably safer.  But is lighting them a bit too early?

When is the right time to light up the holiday lights on your house?  I personally feel like when you do this it's rushing the season.  Can we do one holiday at a time?

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I was at the mall a couple of weeks ago and there were already holiday decorations displayed - like some of the stores already had their own decorations for Christmas up.  This was before Halloween.  Why do we want to rush through the holidays and head right to the end of the year?

There are a lot of light displays that you can see around the area.  Some of those are fairly elaborate.  But even most of those don't open until at least Thanksgiving weekend or later.

Is it that retail marketing is trying to get a jump on sales and trying to take advantage of early shopping to try and deter online shopping?  Whatever the reason, it seems like holidays should stay in their lane.  Let's enjoy each one as it comes.

Check Out the Best-Selling Album From the Year You Graduated High School

Do you remember the top album from the year you graduated high school? Stacker analyzed Billboard data to determine just that, looking at the best-selling album from every year going all the way back to 1956. Sales data is included only from 1992 onward when Nielsen's SoundScan began gathering computerized figures.

Going in chronological order from 1956 to 2020, we present the best-selling album from the year you graduated high school.

Photos From Oktoberfest 2021 at Schells Brewery in New Ulm, Minnesota