The Old Farmer's Almanac has made its Minnesota weather predictions known for the upcoming summer of 2021.

Will it be a dry summer? Will it be an exceptionally hot summer? How stormy a summer is it going to be? How early will the warm weather start? How long into the fall of 2021 will it last?

The Old Farmer's Almanac claims to have a historical accuracy rate fo about 80% when it comes to their seasonal forecasts, so let's see what they have to say.

Old Farmer's Almanac

Here's what the Old Farmer's Almanac has to say about the upcoming winter specifically  for the Upper Midwest including Minnesota, Wisconsin, the eastern Dakotas, and northern Michigan:

WILL IT BE A HOT SUMMER?

Make sure your air conditioner is tuned up and ready to go. In Minnesota, Wisconsin and northern Michigan, summer will be hotter than normal, with the hottest periods in early June, early July, and mid- and late August.

Get our free mobile app

WILL WE HAVE AN ESPECIALLY WET SUMMER?

Sprinklers will be running overtime this summer to keep Minnesota lawns green, as this summer is expected to be drier than normal across the upper midwest.

HOW DOES THE ALMANAC PREDICT THE WEATHER?

The Old Farmer’s Almanac employs three scientific disciplines to make long-range predictions: solar science, the study of sunspots and other solar activity; climatology, the study of prevailing weather patterns; and meteorology, the study of the atmosphere. We predict weather trends and events by comparing solar patterns and historical weather conditions with current solar activity.

So in a nutshell, the Old Farmer's Almanac is predicting above normal temperatures, with below normal precipitation.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.